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If you are not able to see this sweepstroke video, click here.

Let’s get a couple things out of the way. The purpose of the sweep stroke is to drive the punyo into the opponent’s face. Done properly, the sweep stroke is an aggressive move designed to either hit the opponent or drive him backward.

Professor Remy Presas’ sweep stroke was incredible. Not only was he aggressive but he was awful fast too. If you were not paying attention, you were going to pay for it. Ditto for my instructor, Master Chuck Gauss. For example, check out the video below. In particular, see 2:14 of the video where Master Chuck demonstrates the left sweep stroke with intent. Also view his right sweep stroke at 3:20.

If you are not able to view the video, click here.

I’m merely reiterating Master Chuck’s point with respect to the sweep stroke, albeit at a slower pace. Either way, it must be done with intent! One can amplify the intent by stepping in. If you, as the driver, do not step in, the intent will be absent.

Another common error is a low sweep stroke, depicted at the 1:20 mark of the video. A low sweep stroke does not represent as much of a threat to the defender as one aimed at the face.

Yet another common mistake is over-rotating on your sweep stroke entry, depicted at the 1:30 mark of the video. When executing the sweep stroke, you should be splitting your opponent’s center line. In contrast, when over-rotating, you are bypassing your opponent’s center line. Why not attack the center line?

In summary, step in with forward pressure, aim for the face, and split the center line when executing the sweep stroke.

While you’re reading this, subscribe to my YouTube channel! 🙂

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